Kim et al., Stem Cells, 2009

Bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BMNCs) have been shown to effectively treat ischemic cardiovascular diseases. Because diabetic neuropathy (DN) is causally associated with impaired angiogenesis and deficiency of angiogenic and neurotrophic factors in the nerves, we investigated whether DN can be ameliorated by local injection of BMNCs. Severe peripheral neuropathy, characterized by a significant decrease in the motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities (NCVs), developed 12 weeks after the induction of diabetes with streptozotocin in rats. The injection of BMNCs restored motor and sensory NCVs to

Read More

Kim et al., Antioxid Redox Signal, 2009

Cell therapy has tremendous potential for the damaged heart, which has limited self-renewing capability. Bone marrow (BM) cells are attractive for cell therapy, as they contain diverse stem and progenitor cell populations that can give rise to various cell types, including cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells. Studies have shown BM cells to be safe and efficacious in the treatment of myocardial infarction. Possible therapeutic mechanisms mediated by both host and transplanted cells include cardiomyogenesis, neovascularization, and attenuation of adverse remodeling. In this review, different stem and

Read More

Cho et al., Regen Med, 2006

Since the first experiments of cell transplantation into the heart were performed in the early 1990s, the identification of adult stem cells has triggered attempts to regenerate damaged heart tissue by cellular transplantation. Until recently, a multitude of adult stem or progenitor cells from various tissues have been proposed to meet this end. Bone marrow in particular has emerged as the most promising source for stem and progenitor cells because, besides being the organ of hematopoietic maintenance, it contains a complex assortment of stem and progenitor cells. A large body of provocative experimental evidence for

Read More

Lee et al., Exp Hematol, 2006

We have identified a subpopulation of stem cells within adult human bone marrow (BM), isolated at the single-cell level, that self-renew without loss of multipotency for more than 6 to 9 months of continuous cultures and exhibit the capacity for differentiation into cells of three germ layers. Based on surface marker expression, these clonally expanded human bone marrow-derived multipotent stem cells (hBMSCs) do not appear to belong to previously described BM-derived stem or progenitor cell populations.

Read More

Lee et al., Cell Cycle, 2005

Congestive heart failure is a growing, worldwide epidemic. The major causes of heart failure are related to irreversible damage resulting from myocardial infarction (heart attack). The long-standing axiom has been that the myocardium has a limited capacity for self-repair or regeneration; and the irreversible loss of cardiac muscle and accompanying contraction and fibrosis of myocardial scar tissue, sets into play a series of events, namely, progressive ventricular remodeling of nonischemic myocardium that ultimately leads to progressive heart failure. The loss of cardiomyocyte survival cues is associated with diverse

Read More

Bosch-Marcé et al., Vasc Med, 2005

Hyperhomocyst(e)inemia (HH) is an established independent risk factor for coronary, cerebral and peripheral vascular diseases. Recent studies have indicated that certain cardiovascular risk factors, including diabetes and hypercholesterolemia, impair expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and endogenous angiogenesis. In this study, we investigate the impact of moderate HH on angiogenesis and VEGF pathway in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia. Upon induction of unilateral hindlimb ischemia, endogenous angiogenesis, expression of VEGF, and phosphorylation of the VEGF receptor Flk-1 were

Read More

Yoon, Discov Med, 2005

Extract: Congestive heart failure is a growing, worldwide epidemic. The major causes of heart failure are related to irreversible damage resulting from myocardial infarction. The long-standing axiom has been that the myocardium has a limited capacity for self-repair or regeneration; and the irreversible loss of cardiac muscle and accompanying contraction and fibrosis of myocardial scar tissue sets into play a series of events that ultimately lead to progressive heart failure. The loss of cardiomyocyte survival cues is associated with diverse pathways for heart failure, underscoring the importance of maintaining the number of

Read More

Yoon et al., Biol Cell, 2005

Despite significant therapeutic advances, heart failure remains the predominant cause of mortality in the Western world. Ischaemic cardiomyopathy and myocardial infarction are typified by the irreversible loss of cardiac muscle (cardiomyocytes) and vasculature composed of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, which are essential for maintaining cardiac integrity and function. The recent identification of adult and embryonic stem cells has triggered attempts to directly repopulate these tissues by stem cell transplantation as a novel therapeutic option. Reports describing provocative and hopeful examples of myocardial

Read More

Yoon et al., Mol Cell Biochem, 2004

Emerging evidence has shown that administration of angiogenic growth factors, either as recombinant protein or by gene transfer, can augment tissue perfusion through neovascularization in animal models of myocardial and hindlimb ischemia. Many cytokines have angiogenic activity; one of those that have been best studied in animal models and clinical trials is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF has been known to be a key regulator of physiologic and pathologic angiogenesis associated with tumor. Recently the effect of VEGF is not restricted to the direct angiogenic effect in vivo but includes mobilization of

Read More