Kusano et al., Nat Med, 2005

Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a crucial regulator of organ development during embryogenesis. We investigated whether intramyocardial gene transfer of naked DNA encoding human Shh (phShh) could promote a favorable effect on recovery from acute and chronic myocardial ischemia in adult animals, not only by promoting neovascularization, but by broader effects, consistent with the role of this morphogen in embryogenesis. After Shh gene transfer, the hedgehog pathway was upregulated in mammalian fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes. This resulted in preservation of left ventricular function in both acute and chronic

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Ii et al., Circulation, 2005

Peripheral neuropathy is a frequent and major complication of diabetes. Severe peripheral neuropathy developed in type II diabetic mice, characterized by significant slowing of motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities. Rosuvastatin restored nerve vascularity, including vessel size, and nerve function also recovered to the levels of nondiabetic mice. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression in sciatic nerves was reduced in diabetic mice but was preserved by rosuvastatin. Coadministration of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor with rosuvastatin attenuated the beneficial effects of rosuvastatin on nerve function

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Kishore et al., J Clin Invest, 2005

TNF-alpha modulates EC proliferation and thereby plays a central role in new blood vessel formation in physiologic and pathologic circumstances. TNF-alpha is known to downregulate cyclin A, a key cell cycle regulatory protein, but little else is known about how TNF-alpha modulates EC cell cycle and angiogenesis. Using primary ECs, we show that ezrin, previously considered to act primarily as a cytoskeletal protein and in cytoplasmic signaling, is a TNF-alpha-induced transcriptional repressor. TNF-alpha exposure leads to Rho kinase-mediated phosphorylation of ezrin, which translocates to the nucleus and binds to cell

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Kirchmair et al., Circulation, 2005

Toxic neuropathies induced by cisplatin and other chemotherapeutic agents are important clinical problems because of their high incidence, their lack of effective treatment, and the fact that neuropathy represents a dose-limiting factor for these therapies. The pathogenic basis for toxic neuropathies induced by chemotherapeutic agents has not been completely elucidated. We investigated the hypothesis that experimental toxic neuropathy results from an antiangiogenic effect of these drugs, resulting in destruction of the vasa nervorum, and accordingly that the neuropathy could be prevented or reversed by locally

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Yoon et al., Circulation, 2005

Diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by microvascular pathology and interstitial fibrosis, which leads to progressive heart failure; however, the pathogenesis of DCM remains uncertain. Using the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model, we evaluated the natural course of DCM over a period of 1 year by serial echocardiography, Western blot analysis for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), endothelial progenitor cell assays, myocardial blood flow measurements, and histopathologic analysis that included terminal dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL), capillary and cardiomyocyte density, and fibrosis

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Yoon et al., J Clin Invest, 2005

We have identified a subpopulation of stem cells within adult human BM, isolated at the single-cell level, that self-renew without loss of multipotency for more than 140 population doublings and exhibit the capacity for differentiation into cells of all 3 germ layers. Based on surface marker expression, these clonally expanded human BM-derived multipotent stem cells (hBMSCs) do not appear to belong to any previously described BM-derived stem cell population. Intramyocardial transplantation of hBMSCs after myocardial infarction resulted in robust engraftment of transplanted cells, which exhibited colocalization

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Walter et al., Circulation, 2004

Drug-eluting stents represent a useful strategy for the prevention of restenosis using various antiproliferative drugs. These strategies share the liability of impairing endothelial recovery, thereby altering the natural biology of the vessel wall and increasing the associated risk of stent thrombosis. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that local delivery via gene-eluting stent of naked plasmid DNA encoding for human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-2 could achieve similar reductions in neointima formation while accelerating, rather than inhibiting, reendothelialization. phVEGF 2-plasmid (100 or 200 microg per

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Yoon et al., Circulation, 2004

There has been a rapid increase in the number of clinical trials using unselected bone marrow (BM) cells or the mononuclear fraction of BM cells for treating ischemic heart diseases. Thus far, no significant deleterious effects or complications have been reported in any studies using BM-derived cells for treatment of various cardiac diseases. Seven-week-old female Fisher-344 rats underwent surgery to induce acute myocardial infarction and were randomized into 3 groups of 16 rats, each receiving intramyocardial injection of either 7×10(5) DiI-labeled total BM cells (TBMCs), the same number of DiI-labeled, clonally

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Weis et al., J Clin Invest, 2004

Ischemia resulting from myocardial infarction (MI) promotes VEGF expression, leading to vascular permeability (VP) and edema, a process that we show here contributes to tissue injury throughout the ventricle. This permeability/edema can be assessed noninvasively by MRI and can be observed at the ultrastructural level as gaps between adjacent endothelial cells. Many of these gaps contain activated platelets adhering to exposed basement membrane, reducing vessel patency. Following MI, genetic or pharmacological blockade of Src preserves endothelial cell barrier function, suppressing VP and infarct volume,

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Yoon and Losordo, Circ Res, 2003

Ischemic disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, accounting for almost 50% of overall mortality, and endothelial dysfunction is a key pathophysiological process that underlies both myocardial and peripheral ischemia. The prevalence of peripheral arterial disease is 12% in the United States, where 150 000 patients undergo lower-limb amputations every year. The overall prognosis after amputation is guarded at best, given a perioperative mortality rate of 5% to 20% and 2-year follow-up mortality rate of 40%. For those patients who have advanced ischemic cardiac or peripheral

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