Poole et al., JAMA, 2013

Effect of progenitor cell mobilization with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with peripheral artery disease: a randomized clinical trial.

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Ban et al., Circulation, 2013

Although methods for generating cardiomyocytes from pluripotent stem cells have been reported, current methods produce heterogeneous mixtures of cardiomyocytes and noncardiomyocyte cells. Here, we report an entirely novel system in which pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are purified by cardiomyocyte-specific molecular beacons (MBs). MBs are nanoscale probes that emit a fluorescence signal when hybridized to target mRNAs.

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Wang et al., Nat Cell Biol, 2013

Mammalian somatic cells can be directly reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by introducing defined sets of transcription factors. Somatic cell reprogramming involves epigenomic reconfiguration, conferring iPSCs with characteristics similar to embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Human ESCs (hESCs) contain 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), which is generated through the oxidation of 5-methylcytosine by the TET enzyme family. Here we show that 5hmC levels increase significantly during reprogramming to human iPSCs mainly owing to TET1 activation, and this hydroxymethylation change is critical for optimal epigenetic reprogramming, but does not compromise primed pluripotency.

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Sohn et al., Biomaterials, 2013

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Since the successful generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from adult somatic cells using integrating-viral methods, various methods have been tried for iPSC generation using non-viral and non-integrating technique for clinical applications. Recently, various non-viral approaches such as protein, mRNA, microRNA, and small molecule transduction were developed to avoid genomic integration and generate stem cell-like cells from mouse and human fibroblasts. Despite these successes, there has been no successful generation of iPSC from bone marrow (BM)-derived hematopoietic cells derived using

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Jeong et al., Circ Res, 2011

Bone marrow (BM)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold great promise for cardiovascular cell therapy owing to their multipotency and culture expandability. The aim of the study was to investigate whether MSCs can treat experimental acute myocardial infarction (MI) and diabetic neuropathy. We isolated mononuclear cells from mouse BM and cultured MSCs in a conventional manner. Flow cytometry analyses of these cultured cells at passage 4 showed expression of typical MSC markers such as CD44 and CD29, but not hematopoietic markers such as c-kit, flk1, and CD34. To determine the therapeutic effects of MSCs,

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Lee et al., Circulation, 2010

Emerging evidence has suggested a contribution of bone marrow (BM) cells to lymphatic vessel formation; however, the exact phenotype of the cells with lymphatic endothelial progenitor cell function has yet to be identified. Here, we investigate the identity of BM-derived lymphatic endothelial progenitor cells and their role in lymphatic neovascularization. Culture of BM-mononuclear cells in the presence of vascular endothelial growth factors A and C and endothelial growth factor resulted in expression of lymphatic endothelial cell markers. Among these cells, podoplanin(+) cells were isolated by magnetic-activated cell sorting

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Kim et al., J Am Coll Cardiol, 2010

This study aimed to determine if CD31 is a novel marker of a circulating angio-vasculogenic cell population and to establish the cells’ therapeutic effects on experimental ischemia. Emerging evidence suggested that therapeutic mechanisms underlying various bone marrow-derived cells are due to paracrine effects. Furthermore, the vasculogenic potential of these cells is under debate. CD31 is a well-known marker for endothelial cells but is also expressed in a fraction of peripheral blood (PB) mononuclear cells. CD31(+) cells were isolated from human PB by magnetic-activated cell sorting. The gene expression

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Kim et al., Circ Res, 2010

Bone marrow (BM) cells play an important role in physiological and therapeutic neovascularization. However, it remains unclear whether any specific uncultured BM cell populations have higher angiogenic and vasculogenic activities. Moreover, there has been controversy regarding the vasculogenic ability of BM cells. Preliminary flow cytometric analysis showed that CD31, traditionally a marker for endothelial cells, is expressed in certain nonendothelial BM mononuclear cells in both human and mouse. Based on the conserved CD31 expression in the axis of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSC/HPCs) to endothelial

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Jeong et al., Circulation, 2009

Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are known to promote neovascularization in ischemic diseases. Recent evidence suggested that diabetic neuropathy is causally related to impaired angiogenesis and deficient growth factors. Accordingly, we investigated whether diabetic neuropathy could be reversed by local transplantation of EPCs. We found that motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities, blood flow, and capillary density were reduced in sciatic nerves of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice but recovered to normal levels after hind-limb injection of bone marrow-derived EPCs. Injected EPCs were preferentially

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